MIT summer courses for energy professionals

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Short Programs offers educational opportunities to talented practitioners who can incorporate this new knowledge into industry and government settings. Photo: Stuart Darsch

This summer, MIT Short Programs (formerly known as the Professional Institute) is offering ten courses relating to energy and transportation—more offerings than in any other category. Courses range from Daniel Nocera’s “Solar Energy: Capturing the Sun” and Greg Stephanopoulos' “Biofuels from Biomass: Technology and Policy Considerations” to Vladimir Bulović and Marc Baldo’s “Organic, Molecular, and Nanostructured Electronics.”

In addition, there are two new courses, available for the first time this summer, that focus on economics and policy—“Geological Carbon Sequestration: Science, Technology, and Policy,” taught by Ruben Juanes and Howard Herzog, and “Energy in the Context of Climate Policy: Strategic Challenges and Opportunities,” taught by Mort Webster.

Students attending MIT Professional Education classes are scientists, engineers, technologists, and business leaders who are decision-makers in their fields. MIT faculty and students are helping to put advanced research on energy and sustainability in the public’s eye. Short Programs, which parallels MIT’s research priorities, offers educational opportunities to talented practitioners who can incorporate this new knowledge into industry and government settings.

President Susan Hockfield pointed to an impressive flow of inventions when she shared a White House podium with President Barack Obama on March 23 as he called for a historic level of Federal funding for clean energy research. For full impact, of course, these innovations must become part of industry practice—and that is where MIT’s Professional Education office comes in.

For more information, visit the Short Programs—Energy and Transportation course descriptions.